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CW: Body shaming, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation

I know that in the current climate, there are arguably more important feminist issues to talk about – ­austerity, domestic violence, Dapper Laughs – ­ and I am as vocal as you like about those. But I want to talk to you about pro wrestling.

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We generally advocate body acceptance and positivity here at the Jar Belles, but if you’re really desperate to improve your body – we’re here to help.

It’s that time of year again. McFlurry sales are on the rise, Poundland hand fans are objects of lust, and city shorts seem like viable office wear. For many of us, summer is a time to panic. We all want to spend our hard-earned dosh on a break in the sunshine, but are our bodies ready for it? Probably not.

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Just look at this goddamn mess.

socialist

Terms and conditions: part one

Terms and conditions: part two

So far in our quest for a set of feminist terms and definitions, we’ve covered some basics and some not-so-basics. Now we’ll get onto the complicated stuff, e.g. various types of feminism. This gets complicated because different groups have their own interpretations on what each of these things mean, so may not agree exactly with the definitions we have here.

I’d also like to explicitly point out that being a feminist does not mean having to subscribe to any of the below groups, or any other feminist group. Feminism is more of a spectrum than a cluster of rigidly defined groups, and the sooner we reject the idea of clear cut labels, the sooner I believe we can work together towards our goals. With that in mind, it can be confusing not to know the basics of each group – hence why I’m attempting to define each approach. So, without further ado:

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CW: Police brutality
So, you’ve decided to flex your right to protest and are going to your very first march, demo, or other direct action. Great! More people should be politically active and in these trying times, every activist counts. Chances are, you’ll have a good time, will meet other politically-engaged people and can feel proud that you took a stand and fought for something you believe in.
It’s good to be prepared. I’m not an experienced activist by any stretch of the imagination, but I’m lucky enough to know some protest veterans and I’ve been cobbling together information so that I can share it with other newbies. In addition to reading this article and other information available on the web, I highly recommend attending a Green and Black Cross workshop. I went to one of their workshops (they’re free, so there’s no excuse not to) at the Protest, Policing and Civil Rights event held at SOAS Student Union a few days ago, and it was well worth it. The workshops go into more detail than I’m sketching out below, and going through the information with real life people will help you to retain the information and give you the opportunity to ask questions. The Green and Black Cross are brilliant at giving protesters information and support – please check out their website.