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Have you, like me, spent the last twelve years mourning the loss of Buffy the Vampire Slayer?

Fear not. For I’ve compiled a list of my favourite TV shows, carefully researched over many hours, that you can delve into to get that feminist kick. Some are new, some are old, some will make you laugh and some will make you cry, but all are guaranteed to make you feel much better than the average rape-tastic Game of Thrones episode.

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CW: Plastic surgery

I woke one morning recently with a pretty bad hangover and staggered to the bathroom to inspect the damage. This usually consists of checking whether my eyes are gummed together with last night’s make-up, whether my fake eyelashes are stuck to my chin or whether I have transferred a hand-stamp to forehead. This time, however, there was something new. Beyond the usual mascara catastrophe or gin-fed pimples.

I had forehead wrinkles.

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CW: Sexual violence, violence against women

Genres are malleable. They can transform or expand their scope and they can bleed into each other so much that solid definitions become troublesome. From that perspective, it is best not to define a genre as a specific thing but rather a set of always expanding elements that, when used on their own or in conjunction with other elements, can achieve a narrative aim.

disobedient

The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) currently features ‘Disobedient Objects’, an exhibition which covers protests from around the world and the objects which aid and sometimes drive these protests. The V&A describes the exhibition as “the first to examine the powerful role of objects in movements for social change. It demonstrates how political activism drives a wealth of design ingenuity and collective creativity that defy standard definitions of art and design.” The objects are donated by the activists who created them, and these activists have been involved in protests against a huge range of Big Bads: gender stereotypes, sweatshops, the Iraq war, mass lay-offs, nuclear power, and government inaction during the AIDS crisis, among others.